Size 20 mother drops 12st after taking up weightlifting | Daily Mail Online

After joining a gym, Amy, who is a salon management student and is married to Sam, 26, discovered she had a knack for lifting weights and has now lost an incredible 12 stone, dropping to a size 8.

Now the 5ft 10in weight-lifter, who was bullied and called a ‘whale’ because of her size, says she has never felt more confident about her body.

Amy said: ‘I’d always been big, and when I found out I was pregnant with my daughter, I started eating for two.

via Size 20 mother drops 12st after taking up weightlifting | Daily Mail Online.

Comparative evaluation of 0.1% turmeric mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate in prevention of plaque and gingivitis: A clinical and microbiological study

Comparative evaluation of 0.1% turmeric mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate in prevention of plaque and gingivitis: A clinical and microbiological study

Amita M. Mali, Roobal Behal, and Suhit S. Gilda1

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Abstract

Background:

The aim of our clinical trial was to assess the efficacy of 0.1% turmeric mouthwash as an anti-plaque agent and its effect on gingival inflammation and to compare it with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate by evaluating the effect on plaque and gingival inflammation and on microbial load

via Comparative evaluation of 0.1% turmeric mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate in prevention of plaque and gingivitis: A clinical and microbiological study.

Ibuprofen: MedlinePlus Drug Information

Why is this medication prescribed?

Prescription ibuprofen is used to relieve pain, tenderness, swelling, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of the lining of the joints) and rheumatoid arthritis (arthritis caused by swelling of the lining of the joints). It is also used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Nonprescription ibuprofen is used to reduce fever and to relieve minor aches and pain from headaches, muscle aches, arthritis, menstrual periods, the common cold, toothaches, and backaches. Ibuprofen is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. It works by stopping the body’s production of a substance that causes pain, fever, and inflammation

via Ibuprofen: MedlinePlus Drug Information.

Ibuprofen: MedlinePlus Drug Information

IMPORTANT WARNING:

People who take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (other than aspirin) such as ibuprofen may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or a stroke than people who do not take these medications. These events may happen without warning and may cause death. This risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a long time. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had heart disease, a heart attack, or a stroke;if you smoke;and if you have or have ever had high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes. Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness in one part or side of the body, or slurred speech.

If you will be undergoing a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG; a type of heart surgery), you should not take ibuprofen right before or right after the surgery.

NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may develop at any time during treatment, may happen without warning symptoms, and may cause death. The risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a long time, are older in age, have poor health, or who drink three or more alcoholic drinks per day while taking ibuprofen. Tell your doctor if you take any of the following medications: anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin); aspirin; other NSAIDs such as ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Actron) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); or oral steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Deltasone). Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had ulcers, bleeding in your stomach or intestines, or other bleeding disorders. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking ibuprofen and call your doctor: stomach pain, heartburn, vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will monitor your symptoms carefully and will probably order certain tests to check your body’s response to ibuprofen. Be sure to tell your doctor how you are feeling so that your doctor can prescribe the right amount of medication to treat your condition with the lowest risk of serious side effects.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with prescription ibuprofen and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm) or the manufacturer’s website to obtain the Medication Guide.

via Ibuprofen: MedlinePlus Drug Information.

What Is a Heart Attack? – NHLBI, NIH

A heart attack happens when the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a section of heart muscle suddenly becomes blocked and the heart can’t get oxygen. If blood flow isn’t restored quickly, the section of heart muscle begins to die.

Heart attacks are a leading killer of both men and women in the United States. The good news is that excellent treatments are available for heart attacks. These treatments can save lives and prevent disabilities.

Heart attack treatment works best when it’s given right after symptoms occur. If you think you or someone else is having a heart attack (even if you’re not fully sure), call9–1–1 right away.

via What Is a Heart Attack? – NHLBI, NIH.

Common Cold Facts: Causes, Viruses, Prevention, Kids and Colds, and More

 

Sneezing, scratchy throat, runny nose — everyone knows the first miserable signs of a common cold. But what is a common cold really? What causes you to catch colds frequently while your best friend stays well? And more importantly, how can you prevent getting a cold this season? Here are some common cold basics to help you protect yourself and your family from getting sick.

The common cold is a group of symptoms in the upper respiratory tract caused by a large number of different viruses. Although more than 200 viruses can cause the common cold, the perpetrator is usually the rhinovirus, which is to blame for causing 10% to 40% of colds. Also, the coronaviruses cause about 20% of colds, and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza virus each cause 10% of colds.

Although the common cold is usually mild, it is a leading cause of doctor visits and missed days from school and work. According to the CDC, 22 million school days are lost annually in the U.S. because of the common cold. Some estimates state that Americans suffer 1 billion colds annually.

For more detail, see WebMD’s article on Common Cold Causes.

via Common Cold Facts: Causes, Viruses, Prevention, Kids and Colds, and More.

Can You Really “Catch A Cold” When It’s Cold Out? | IFLScience

https://i0.wp.com/www.iflscience.com/sites/www.iflscience.com/files/styles/ifls_large/public/blog/%5Bnid%5D/cold.jpgCatching a cold when it’s chilly out has been dismissed by many as an unsubstantiated myth, though most of us might still remember our parents telling us to put on another jacket before heading out. Turns out, they were right! The rhinovirus, better known as the common cold virus, multiplies more efficiently in the cold. The lower the temperature, the lower the immune response, according to a new study published in published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week.

The temperature in our lungs stays around 37 degrees Celsius, whereas the nasal cavity ranges between 33 and 35 degrees Celsius due to the ambient air we inhale. Previous work have found that rhinoviruses replicate more efficiently in the cooler nasal cavity than in the warmer lungs. However, these studies focused on how body temperature influenced the virus — and not the relationship between temperature and immune response.

via Can You Really “Catch A Cold” When It’s Cold Out? | IFLScience.